How to Fix Your Flexi-Flyer Part 2

The radiator support makes use of a similar, but smaller diameter bushing. In terms of relationship, it’s installed opposite of the four subframe mounts/bushings. And again, this shows the optional ARP stainless fasteners.

How to Fix Your Flexi-Flyer Part 2

Click Here to Begin Slideshow
In our last issue we dug into OEM mounts and similar aftermarket rubber and polyurethane jobs. We also mentioned the really slick Detroit Speed bill mount packages offered for Camaros, Firebirds, Novas and similar GM cars with removable subframes. The Detroit Speed mounts are available in two different heights: Stock or ½ height. The reason for the ½ height configuration is to shorten the distance between the subframe and the body. In turn, the car is lowered by approximately ½-inch, which obviously can improve handling (from a corner carving point of view) Something to keep in mind is this: Once the subframe has been moved upward (in relation to the body), it also alters the relationship between the steering column and the steering box. With clutch-equipped cars, it also alters the relationship in the clutch linkage. Something else to ponder is it also moves the transmission and headers up in the car by ½-inch. If you chose to incorporate the shorter than stock mounts, be prepared for some slight fit adjustments (in a lot of different spots).

In any case, both of the Detroit Speed body mount bushing kits -- stock height or ½ height, also includes a set of billet aluminum radiator core mounts. The rad support bushings are hard anodized like the body mounts, and as you can see in the accompanying photos all of the mounts all have a clever profile-milling job done on them.

Since the platforms are related, is it possible to use a 1967-1969 Camaro mount kit on something like a 1968-74 Nova? After all, the subframes are, for all intents and purposes identical. While that is very true, in stock form, Novas made use of a short spacer on the pair of body mounts nearest the firewall. The Camaro did not incorporate this spacer. You can reuse your existing spacers or you can use the cool hard-anodized jobs that Detroit Speed offers (they’re included in the respective Nova bolt kit, which has longer appropriate fasteners).

The following are part numbers for the various Detroit Speed bushings mentioned in the text:


Description Part Number

Stock Height Mounts 010301
½ height Mounts 010201
Bolt Kit with Body Mount Spacers 010803
Bolt Kit without Spacers 010801


There’s only one precaution you should take when installing the body mount kit with stainless ARP fasteners, and it’s really important: Be absolutely positively certain you coat the threads of the stainless bolts with anti-seize. Galling is an extremely common predicament associated with stainless steel fasteners. The problem can be so bad the parts actually weld themselves together (been there, done that and it’s not fun). The correct term for the galling is “friction welding”. And yes, it’s more common than you think and it can even happen when the fasteners are finger tightened. Bottom line? Always use anti-seize on stainless fastener threads!

For more info on Detroit Speed’s body mount bushing sets, check out the accompanying photos:
Click Here to Begin Slideshow

How to Fix Your Flexi-Flyer Part 2

Here’s a look at the two-piece Detroit Speed mounts along with a powder coated factory Nova spacer (you can reuse the stock spacer or use Detroit Speed’s hard anodized job).

How to Fix Your Flexi-Flyer Part 2

This photo shows the Detroit Speed mount installed in the subframe, from the bottom side. Note the optional ARP fastener as well as the beveled washer.

How to Fix Your Flexi-Flyer Part 2

Same setup, but the topside of the subframe. These are standard height subframe bushings.

How to Fix Your Flexi-Flyer Part 2

How to Fix Your Flexi-Flyer Part 2

The radiator support makes use of a similar, but smaller diameter bushing. In terms of relationship, it’s installed opposite of the four subframe mounts/bushings. And again, this shows the optional ARP stainless fasteners.

How to Fix Your Flexi-Flyer Part 2

An absolute “Must Do” is to use anti-seize compound on the threads of stainless fasteners. If you don’t, you might end up cutting them off (just ask me!).

How to Fix Your Flexi-Flyer Part 2

If you’re contemplating a set of the lowered bushings, keep things like transmission height in the tunnel, exhaust fit, clutch fit and steering fit in mind. They’re all affected by reduced height bushings.

Back to Post

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*


I agree to receive emails from RacingJunk.com. I understand that I can unsubscribe at any time. Privacy Policy