Inside XS Power’s Lineup Of High Performance Batteries Part 1

The V3400 battery is a big brute and it’s perfect for starting a large displacement stroker motor on the street. In terms of dimensions, it measures 10.28-inches in length, 7.24-inches in height and 6.75-inches in width. Note however the base of the battery is slightly smaller, which allows it to fit into more common battery trays.

Inside XS Power’s Lineup Of High Performance Batteries Part I

It should be no secret that over the recent years, battery technology has advanced rapidly. We’re not talking Tesla style electric car stuff here either. What we’re talking about is the basic battery (or two) you need to run your race or high performance car. And because of the advancements, we figured it was high time we delve deeper into high performance batteries. Some of the research might be suprising:

Aside from a magneto, common ignition systems used today need some sort of battery power for operation (including energy storage). No secret. Fair enough, but what type of battery does your hot rod or race car require? There is no one size fits all solution. Let’s start from the top: Batteries are rated by capacity. Capacity is the amount of electrical current or amps a given battery can supply for a specific period of time. Older battery ratings were based upon "Ampere Hour" ratings, but the “current” rating system is based upon "CCA" (Cold Cranking Amps) or “CA” (Cranking Amps) system. Ampere Hour (Ah) is easy to figure out. The others aren’t. According to XS Power Batteries, “People often wonder what the term “amp hours” means when referring to batteries. Many people assume that “Ah” (amp hours abbreviated) is a standardized rating for a battery’s ability to discharge current -- a true statement. The actual method for determining the Ah rating is more often not fully understood by the automotive enthusiast.

“Ah capacity is measured in hours. Ah is most commonly used to rate deep-cycle type batteries, or any type of battery used for relatively low discharge rates across an extended period of time. Most batteries, including XS Power batteries, are tested in a 20-hour cycle. Ah tests can be performed for 10 hour cycles at a higher amp load, but results are not as useful for determining long term capacity.”

When it comes to Cranking Amps, this determines the battery's capability of delivering current (amps) at 32-degrees F. Cranking Amps typically range from 250 to 800 amps (and evenhigher in some high performance batteries), but consider that some CA ratings are on the optimistic side. In order to tackle rating games, compare the "RC" or Reserve Capacity ratings of the batteries in question. Reserve Capacity determines how long the ignition along with other electrical components can function by the battery alone. Essentially, the Reserve Capacity (RC) rating can be defined as the number of minutes a new, fully charged battery at 80°F (27°C) can be discharged at 25 amps and maintain a voltage equal to or higher than 1.75 volts per cell. This turns out to be 10.5 volts for a 12 Volt battery.

For comparison sake, I have an Energizer Group 75 battery in one of my vehicles. It has an RC of 100 minutes. I also keep a big Delco Group 24 battery on hand as a booster battery. It has an RC of 130 minutes. The XS Power AGM battery shown in the accompanying photos has an RC of 135 minutes. But that’s certainly not all:

A high-powered ignition system such as an MSD 7 can create considerable extra load on the battery as well as the charging system. When you increase the demand upon the battery, it must be capable of handling the load. Amp Hour ratings are important (and very useful) here. The big XS Power S3400 battery we’re using as an example has an Ah (Amp Hour) rating of 65.

With that in mind, how does the Ah rating of a battery mesh with ignition components and other electrical “draws” in something like a racecar? According to MSD ignition operating time decreases as engine RPM increases. The smallest dedicated battery for use on an MSD 6 or 7 series ignition system is a 12 Ah example. As an outer limit example, if you use the monster MSD 8 series ignition box in a racecar and you use it a full bark (12,000 RPM), then there’s a current draw of a whopping 36 Amps!

There are a number of other things to ponder too – particularly the additional electrical components found in your car. There's no question that today's crop of cars are becoming ever more complex. They can have high draw electronic fuel injection systems, high capacity electric fuel pumps, electric water pumps, electric fans, electric (or "electronic" solenoid) shifters, throttle stops and even small things like shift lights, gauge lamps along with other components. All of them deplete power and Ah from the battery.

Now what? Before you go much further, it’s a good idea to figure out how many amps (Ah) each of the electrical "accessory" components continuously draws from the battery. Case-in-point: Some of the newer big billet electric fuel pumps can draw 8 Ah or more. Once you've determined the Ah draw for each component, add it up to come up with a total Ah figure. The folks from MSD have a chart that determines the total Ah draw of a typical high powered ignition system at a specific engine RPM:

Ignition Amp Use

RPM (V8 Engine) MSD 6 & 7 Series
————————————————————————————————————
3,000 3
4,000 4
5,000 5
6,000 6
7,000 7
8,000 8
9,000 9
10,000 10
11,000 11
12,000 12

Look at these sample Ah draw figures. As you can see, this would be a pretty simple car. And for our case, pretend the engine sees a maximum RPM ceiling of 7,000 RPM. The math is easy:

- Electric fuel pump: 8 amps
- Electric water pump drive: 5 amps
- Other accessories: 12 amps
- Ignition requirements: 7 amps
_____________________________________________

Total: 32 amps

That’s not the end of it either. Next, multiply the duration of time the car must operate without a battery recharge by the total electrical requirements (above). This is vital for racecars without charging systems. Remember that we're not talking about seven to ten seconds to make a lap down the 1320. You have to keep in mind the time it takes while you "hurry up and wait" in the staging lanes, the time it takes to perform a burnout, the time it takes to stage the car, the time it takes to drive back down the return road and so on. As a result of all of this, a safe figure might prove to be 1/2 hour. Multiply the amp requirement by the time:

32 amps X 1/2 hour = 16 Ah

We’re not done. There’s a final step and it’s rather important: Starting the car. And the Ah draw is bigger than you might think. For most applications, To multiply the final amp requirement (above) by a factor of (at least) 3:

16 Ah X 3 = 48 Ah

That definitive 48 Ah figure is actually the absolute minimum battery size required for the simple example we calculated above. The bottom line here, its what you need to start your car. Should you have a street strip car with a lot of power under the hood and a full compliment of electrical equipment, the final number will actually increase.

That’s a wrap for this issue. In the next segment, we’ll look at several different types of batteries available. XS Power offers several different types for a wide range of applicaions. And thanks them, we can sort through the choices. Watch for it.

###

Source – POWER PACKED ENERGY STORAGE

XS Power Batteries
2847 John Deere Dr. # 102,
Knoxville, TN, 37917
PH: 888-4XSPOWER
PH: 865-688-5953
Website: https://4xspower.com/


Click Here to Begin Slideshow

Inside XS Power’s Lineup Of High Performance Batteries

Automotive batteries come in sorts of different shapes and sizes. Some are good for performance. Some aren’t. Here’s a cheap Walmart battery I have on hand for boosting jobs, along with a honking V3400 AGM battery from XS Power.

Inside XS Power’s Lineup Of High Performance Batteries

Labels affixed to batteries tell an important story. For example, they’ll include CCA (Cold Cranking Amps) or CA (Cranking Amps) and in most cases, they’ll include RC (Reserve Capacity). One of the most important is Ah figure, but not all battery manufacturers include it.

Inside XS Power’s Lineup Of High Performance Batteries

The big XS Power V3400 battery has a maximum amp rating of 3300. The Cranking Amp rating is a whopping 1150 Amps (!) while the Reserve Capacity works out to 160 minutes.

Inside XS Power’s Lineup Of High Performance Batteries

There are several different versions of the 3400 series batteries from XS Power. The “V” (ostensibly “Vintage”) example shown previously or this “S” model. There are no physical or performance differences, aside from color.

Inside XS Power’s Lineup Of High Performance Batteries

The V3400 battery is a big brute and it’s perfect for starting a large displacement stroker motor on the street. In terms of dimensions, it measures 10.28-inches in length, 7.24-inches in height and 6.75-inches in width. Note however the base of the battery is slightly smaller, which allows it to fit into more common battery trays.

Back to Post

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*


I agree to receive emails from RacingJunk.com. I understand that I can unsubscribe at any time. Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2005-2022 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands
All Rights Reserved.

Internet Brands