How to Project Prep: Paperwork Part 1

Click Here to Begin Slideshow It should be no secret that in this “age of information,” you really can’t get enough. And that applies directly to anyone modifying a car, racing a car, or restoring a car. The truth of the matter is, once you’ve armed yourself with information basic mechanics and high-performance work are pretty much guaranteed to march forward in a much smoother manner. But what information do you need? The basics include a selection of resource books, factory service publications along with catalogs from a cross section of aftermarket companies (this is really important when it comes to a restoration). Knowledge of a given car is one thing, but when the time comes to disassemble a component or subassembly, rebuild it or restore it and finally reassemble it, you'll often require more than aptitude with hand tools. Often there’s a specific way something is done. Occasionally, that specific way of working can prove contrary to logic! Because of that, it’s definitely in your best interests to purchase, beg, borrow or scrounge appropriate service publications. What follows is a list of various manuals. The examples are Chevrolet-based, and I’m using these because that’s what I’m familiar with. Many GM products have related manuals and publications available. Other brands also have comparable publications. You just have to seek them out. Factory Service Manual North American vehicle manufacturers printed factory service manuals for various makes and models. None of them will prove to be easy or light reading, but in the case of vintage GM products, they deal with minor service procedures, vehicle maintenance and component adjustment. In addition, they also show the correct way to remove and replace various components and sub-assemblies. Over the years, some manufacturers have bundled Service and Overhaul (below) manuals in one big book. Factory Overhaul Manual When it comes to vintage GM’s, the Overhaul Manual takes over where the Service Manual ends. This book examines the repair and replacement of major components. Where the Service Manual deals with minor repairs, the Overhaul manual delves into more difficult and involved tasks. As you can well imagine, this particular manual series is designed to be used in conjunction with the Service Manual. Body Service Manual Another GM vintage manual was the Fisher Body Service Manual. Essentially, it looks at topics not covered in either the Service or Overhaul publications and related to the actual body structure of the vehicle. A good is example is when you need to remove a special hidden clip on a car. This particular manual details the procedure on how to remove and replace that clip. Fisher Body Service Manuals for a given year cover all passenger cars from that model year (Chevrolet-Pontiac-Olds-Buick-Cadillac). Assembly Instruction Manual GM used a series of manuals on the assembly line for a given automobile, They’re called Assembly Instruction Manuals or "AIMs" and they’re available for many older (popular) GM makes and models. As expected, these were used by workers as the vehicle rolled down the line. Examples available are reprints. Most are printed in a loose-leaf format and feature large sometimes-exploded drawings of all components and sub-assemblies that were pieced together during the manufacturing process. These drawings show where the parts go and how they go together. Part numbers are included, but these are production line numbers, not service (replacement or dealership parts department) numbers. The assembly manual lays out how and where components are bolted together, glued together, indicate proper fastener orientation/installation, proper clamp location and orientation, the correct location of pierced holes and even vehicle ride height specifications. Production options are included along with correct location mounting points and special torque specifications for almost all parts of the automobile. This manual is typically broken down into two parts. The first part covers approximately one dozen basic assembly areas that range from labels to stickers to complete electrical installation. This portion of the Assembly Instruction Manual is called the "Uniform Parts Classification". Following the UPC section is the RPO or "Regular Production Option" portion of the book. Keep in mind many of the AIM’s available today are copies of copies. This can sometimes result is fuzzy text or images. None-the-less, they’re still invaluable when stripping and rebuilding a given automobile. That’s a wrap for this issue. In our next segment, we’ll look at parts catalogs, interchange manuals and aftermarket catalogs. You might be surprised with regard to what’s out there and what’s inside those particular publications. Watch for it. Click Here to Begin Slideshow

How to Project Prep: Paperwork Part 1

Click Here to Begin Slideshow

It should be no secret that in this “age of information,” you really can’t get enough. And that applies directly to anyone modifying a car, racing a car, or restoring a car. The truth of the matter is, once you’ve armed yourself with information basic mechanics and high-performance work are pretty much guaranteed to march forward in a much smoother manner. But what information do you need?

The basics include a selection of resource books, factory service publications along with catalogs from a cross section of aftermarket companies (this is really important when it comes to a restoration). Knowledge of a given car is one thing, but when the time comes to disassemble a component or subassembly, rebuild it or restore it and finally reassemble it, you'll often require more than aptitude with hand tools. Often there’s a specific way something is done. Occasionally, that specific way of working can prove contrary to logic! Because of that, it’s definitely in your best interests to purchase, beg, borrow or scrounge appropriate service publications.

What follows is a list of various manuals. The examples are Chevrolet-based, and I’m using these because that’s what I’m familiar with. Many GM products have related manuals and publications available. Other brands also have comparable publications. You just have to seek them out.

Factory Service Manual

North American vehicle manufacturers printed factory service manuals for various makes and models. None of them will prove to be easy or light reading, but in the case of vintage GM products, they deal with minor service procedures, vehicle maintenance and component adjustment. In addition, they also show the correct way to remove and replace various components and sub-assemblies. Over the years, some manufacturers have bundled Service and Overhaul (below) manuals in one big book.

Factory Overhaul Manual

When it comes to vintage GM’s, the Overhaul Manual takes over where the Service Manual ends. This book examines the repair and replacement of major components. Where the Service Manual deals with minor repairs, the Overhaul manual delves into more difficult and involved tasks. As you can well imagine, this particular manual series is designed to be used in conjunction with the Service Manual.

Body Service Manual

Another GM vintage manual was the Fisher Body Service Manual. Essentially, it looks at topics not covered in either the Service or Overhaul publications and related to the actual body structure of the vehicle. A good is example is when you need to remove a special hidden clip on a car. This particular manual details the procedure on how to remove and replace that clip. Fisher Body Service Manuals for a given year cover all passenger cars from that model year (Chevrolet-Pontiac-Olds-Buick-Cadillac).

Assembly Instruction Manual

GM used a series of manuals on the assembly line for a given automobile, They’re called Assembly Instruction Manuals or "AIMs" and they’re available for many older (popular) GM makes and models. As expected, these were used by workers as the vehicle rolled down the line. Examples available are reprints. Most are printed in a loose-leaf format and feature large sometimes-exploded drawings of all components and sub-assemblies that were pieced together during the manufacturing process. These drawings show where the parts go and how they go together. Part numbers are included, but these are production line numbers, not service (replacement or dealership parts department) numbers. The assembly manual lays out how and where components are bolted together, glued together, indicate proper fastener orientation/installation, proper clamp location and orientation, the correct location of pierced holes and even vehicle ride height specifications. Production options are included along with correct location mounting points and special torque specifications for almost all parts of the automobile.

This manual is typically broken down into two parts. The first part covers approximately one dozen basic assembly areas that range from labels to stickers to complete electrical installation. This portion of the Assembly Instruction Manual is called the "Uniform Parts Classification". Following the UPC section is the RPO or "Regular Production Option" portion of the book. Keep in mind many of the AIM’s available today are copies of copies. This can sometimes result is fuzzy text or images. None-the-less, they’re still invaluable when stripping and rebuilding a given automobile.

That’s a wrap for this issue. In our next segment, we’ll look at parts catalogs, interchange manuals and aftermarket catalogs. You might be surprised with regard to what’s out there and what’s inside those particular publications. Watch for it.

Click Here to Begin Slideshow

How to Project Prep: Paperwork Part 1

One of the most important repair books out there is a factory Service Manual. The original equipment GM Service Manuals handle minor service, adjustment, tune up and other repairs. Other manufacturers bundled Service and Overhaul procedures in one big manual (next photo).

How to Project Prep: Paperwork Part 1

With many vintage GM cars, the Overhaul Manual served as a supplement to the Service Manual. Essentially, it was geared toward major overhauls of major mechanical components.

How to Project Prep: Paperwork Part 1

This is an interesting service publication from GM’s old Fisher Body Division. Essentially it was repair manual for body parts and components. Should a piece of trim prove impossible to remove or something like a window proves impossible to adjust, this is the manual you need. It covers a wide range of body-related topics.

How to Project Prep: Paperwork Part 1

This is a GM AIM or “Assembly Instruction Manual”. It was used on the assembly line to show workers the process of assembling a given vehicle. These books are filled with assembly drawings, descriptions of how options were assembled and more.

How to Project Prep: Paperwork Part 1

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