50 Engine Compartment Detailing Tips Part 2

In our last issue we began a look at engine compartment detailing. Basically, it’s not a how to do it series. Instead, it’s an “idea series”. What I’ve done here is shown you how I lay out the engine compartment in a bare-bones vintage street machine. You don’t have to copy any of it or all of it. But if something turns your crank, please feel free to use it.  Some jokingly call the process “R&D” or… “Rob & Duplicate”!  Last time around we examined the basic platform – subframe, bushings, rad support, inner fenders and so on. None of the parts were one-offs.  All are readily available from a wide range of suppliers. This time around we’ll dig a little deeper into some of the suspension parts along with other details.  And once again, all of the bits and pieces are readily available.  Check out the slide show:

50 Engine Compartment Detailing Tips Part 2

In our last issue we began a look at engine compartment detailing. Basically, it’s not a how to do it series. Instead, it’s an “idea series”. What I’ve done here is shown you how I lay out the engine compartment in a bare-bones vintage street machine. You don’t have to copy any of it or all of it. But if something turns your crank, please feel free to use it.  Some jokingly call the process “R&D” or… “Rob & Duplicate”! 

Last time around we examined the basic platform – subframe, bushings, rad support, inner fenders and so on. None of the parts were one-offs.  All are readily available from a wide range of suppliers. This time around we’ll dig a little deeper into some of the suspension parts along with other details.  And once again, all of the bits and pieces are readily available.  Check out the slide show:

50 Engine Compartment Detailing Tips Part 2

15: The support for the hood latch assembly was out when the rad support came out. As a result, it too was stripped and freshly semi-gloss black. This one was done in a booth, but I’ve also had them powder coated.

50 Engine Compartment Detailing Tips Part 2

The upper and lower a-arms were replaced on this car. Although not a detail item, they certainly don’t hurt the looks. Detroit Speed built these and the quality is fabulous.

50 Engine Compartment Detailing Tips Part 2

The Detroit Speed a-arms incorporate Delrin bushings top and bottom, and as you can see, a nicely machined stainless steel cross shaft. By the way, caster is set by replacing a slug recessed into the cross shaft. Slick idea.

50 Engine Compartment Detailing Tips Part 2

The a-arm flaps or dust shields were also replaced. These pieces came from Classic Industries. Note the new steel staples. They’re installed “backwards” from how they typically came on many cars (staple facing inward). The reason is, I think it looks better.

50 Engine Compartment Detailing Tips Part 2

The idler arm is a new piece too. Look closely and you’ll see the bolts are installed backwards. The reason for this is, it makes for more room, especially when installing headers. Note too the fasteners used here are AN. I like to use them where I can.

50 Engine Compartment Detailing Tips Part 2

The tie rod ends were replaced too. I simply use high quality auto parts store pieces. New tie rod ends means new boots and new zerks. They work well and there are no leaks!

50 Engine Compartment Detailing Tips Part 2

Downstairs, the tie rod sleeves were swapped for a set of billet jobs – this time from Hotchkiss. They’re good quality and the layout makes for easy toe adjustments.

50 Engine Compartment Detailing Tips Part 2

The front brake lines are all hand formed stainless steel. They make use of black Earl’s -3 AN tube nuts and sleeves along with Earl’s AN3 adapters where required.

50 Engine Compartment Detailing Tips Part 2

The stainless brake line that runs below the oil pan was covered with stainless steel spiral armour. It’s available from Classic Industries. I’m not anticipating a rod or two departing (!); the real purpose is to protect the line during engine swaps. Excuse the dust!

50 Engine Compartment Detailing Tips Part 2

Brake lines are held in place with reproduction brake line clips, again from the folks at Classic Industries. These are inexpensive parts that really beat the look and function of decades old hardware.

50 Engine Compartment Detailing Tips Part 2

The Hurst Roll Control was mounted on the driver’s side inner fender and held in place by way of three AN fasteners. On the backside, I used AN flat washers and nylock nuts.

50 Engine Compartment Detailing Tips Part 2

The front adjustable hood bumpers were swapped for these clear zinc plated jobs from Classic Industries. You can also source them with a dark grey phosphate finish. In either case, the kits come complete with new rubber bumpers.

50 Engine Compartment Detailing Tips Part 2

The side bumpers for the hood were also sourced from Classic Industries. Again, these are inexpensive parts that everyone sees when the hood is open. And they’re easy to replace too!

50 Engine Compartment Detailing Tips Part 2

Even though the battery tray and clamp were repainted in this car, they were still ragged. The years take their toll – especially when battery acid is present. I replaced them with these semi-gloss black powder coated reproduction pieces from Classic Industries.

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