Simply Shocking Part 4

Click Here to Begin Slideshow This is our final installment on AFCO’s double adjustable Eliminator series of drag shocks. Over the past three issues, we’ve covered many of the features of the shocks; this time around, we’ll examine AFCO’s coil-over conversion kits for vintage GM cars and also provide you with some firsthand info on how to make the shocks fit. Keep in mind that you have to make room in the car for the shock adjusters. It’s not a big job, but is something you must do. Follow along for a closer look: Coil-Over Conversions… If you have a common GM drag race application (vintage Camaro, Nova, Chevelle, Monte Carlo, etc.), AFCO has something else you might want to ponder. It’s a bolt-in coil-over shock kit. This kit allows for bolt-in, no-modification installation on most popular GM applications. Some of the features include easy side-to-side ride height adjustment, quick corner weight tuning and pre-load changes to straighten out bad launches, and front-end weight reduction. The coil-over setup is based upon AFCO’s bolt-in Eliminator shocks (with BNC valving) coupled with a tapered coil-over spring. These springs fit the OEM upper spring pocket and then taper to a common coil-over diameter at the bottom end. The top spring ID is 4 inches while the bottom ID measures 2-5/8 inches. The lower shock mount uses a typical aluminum coil-over threaded spring seat and lock nut setup. The height is adjusted by way of a coil-over spanner wrench. Kits are available with single and double adjustable shock configurations and with different spring rates. These rates include 300 inch-pound springs, 350 inch-pound springs, 375 inch-pound springs, 450 inch-pound springs, 500 inch-pound springs and 550 inch-pound springs. The rates vary for the application. We have these in our project sleeper Nova and for the application, AFCO’s Eric Saffell recommended a 450 inch-pound spring rate. Making Them Fit… When installing any of AFCO’s double adjustable front shocks, you’ll have to consider the size of the adjuster. The hole size in the lower a-arm must be modified to allow for the adjuster to fit. Some aftermarket a-arms have large holes that will either work as-is or will require minimum grinding to allow for shock clearance. OEM GM (and some aftermarket) a-arms might require the use of a weld-in AFCO shock ring (see the accompanying photos). The rings are included with the front shocks and are also available separately. Basically, the lower a-arm is opened up and then the new shock ring is installed. It’s a large opening that provides full clearance for the compression adjuster. In any case, we recommend you install the shock without a spring and check the adjuster-to-a-arm clearance as the suspension is jacked through the full range of travel. Something else AFCO includes with some of the Eliminator shocks is an additional lower spherical bearing and c-clip. The reason for this is that some applications use a ½-inch inside diameter bearing while others mandate a 5/9-inch ID bearing. The extra spherical bearing is a 5/8-inch job for those applications. As you can see, the folks from AFCO Racing have you covered when it comes to high quality double adjustable shock absorbers. What’s simply shocking about the AFCO Eliminator double adjustable series is the fact that they’re easy to install and easy to adjust. Equally important, the window of adjustment is impressively large. Yes, the double adjustable Eliminators cost more than some of the others, but the quality speaks for itself. So does the shock capability. Once the initial "fear factor" of working with sophisticated shock absorbers is over, you're going to find one thing out very quickly: Shock absorbers can account for more improvements in performance than any other single component in your race car. Period. For a closer look, check out the accompanying photos:

Simply Shocking Part 4

Click Here to Begin Slideshow
This is our final installment on AFCO’s double adjustable Eliminator series of drag shocks. Over the past three issues, we’ve covered many of the features of the shocks; this time around, we’ll examine AFCO’s coil-over conversion kits for vintage GM cars and also provide you with some firsthand info on how to make the shocks fit. Keep in mind that you have to make room in the car for the shock adjusters. It’s not a big job, but is something you must do. Follow along for a closer look:
Coil-Over Conversions…
If you have a common GM drag race application (vintage Camaro, Nova, Chevelle, Monte Carlo, etc.), AFCO has something else you might want to ponder. It’s a bolt-in coil-over shock kit. This kit allows for bolt-in, no-modification installation on most popular GM applications. Some of the features include easy side-to-side ride height adjustment, quick corner weight tuning and pre-load changes to straighten out bad launches, and front-end weight reduction.
The coil-over setup is based upon AFCO’s bolt-in Eliminator shocks (with BNC valving) coupled with a tapered coil-over spring. These springs fit the OEM upper spring pocket and then taper to a common coil-over diameter at the bottom end. The top spring ID is 4 inches while the bottom ID measures 2-5/8 inches. The lower shock mount uses a typical aluminum coil-over threaded spring seat and lock nut setup. The height is adjusted by way of a coil-over spanner wrench. Kits are available with single and double adjustable shock configurations and with different spring rates. These rates include 300 inch-pound springs, 350 inch-pound springs, 375 inch-pound springs, 450 inch-pound springs, 500 inch-pound springs and 550 inch-pound springs. The rates vary for the application. We have these in our project sleeper Nova and for the application, AFCO’s Eric Saffell recommended a 450 inch-pound spring rate.
Making Them Fit…
When installing any of AFCO’s double adjustable front shocks, you’ll have to consider the size of the adjuster. The hole size in the lower a-arm must be modified to allow for the adjuster to fit. Some aftermarket a-arms have large holes that will either work as-is or will require minimum grinding to allow for shock clearance. OEM GM (and some aftermarket) a-arms might require the use of a weld-in AFCO shock ring (see the accompanying photos). The rings are included with the front shocks and are also available separately. Basically, the lower a-arm is opened up and then the new shock ring is installed. It’s a large opening that provides full clearance for the compression adjuster. In any case, we recommend you install the shock without a spring and check the adjuster-to-a-arm clearance as the suspension is jacked through the full range of travel.
Something else AFCO includes with some of the Eliminator shocks is an additional lower spherical bearing and c-clip. The reason for this is that some applications use a ½-inch inside diameter bearing while others mandate a 5/9-inch ID bearing. The extra spherical bearing is a 5/8-inch job for those applications.
As you can see, the folks from AFCO Racing have you covered when it comes to high quality double adjustable shock absorbers. What’s simply shocking about the AFCO Eliminator double adjustable series is the fact that they’re easy to install and easy to adjust. Equally important, the window of adjustment is impressively large.
Yes, the double adjustable Eliminators cost more than some of the others, but the quality speaks for itself. So does the shock capability. Once the initial "fear factor" of working with sophisticated shock absorbers is over, you're going to find one thing out very quickly: Shock absorbers can account for more improvements in performance than any other single component in your race car. Period.
For a closer look, check out the accompanying photos:

Simply Shocking Part 4 1

In the opening article of this series, we showed you the coil-over conversion shock setup from AFCO (out of the car). Here it is installed. Note the compression adjuster poking out of the lower a-arm. More in the next photo:

Simply Shocking Part 4 2

This lower a-arm is from Detroit Speed. In order to fit the shock adjuster in the a-arm, the opening has been enlarged. As noted in the text, we test fit the shock in the pocket without the spring and ran the suspension through its travel to ensure the shock adjuster does not make contact with the a-arm.

Simply Shocking Part 4 3

For a stock lower a-arm, AFCO supplies this weld ring. You simply enlarge the opening in the a-arm and weld in this large diameter ring. With this setup, there’s no danger of the adjuster coming in contact with the a-arm.

Simply Shocking Part 4 4

At the back, the double panel on the inner wheel house had to be notched very slightly in order to make room for the compression adjuster. Other than that, the shocks are a direct bolt-in.

Simply Shocking Part 4 5

Some applications might require a slightly larger ID (5/8-inch versus ½-inch) on the rear lower shock stud mount. Because of this, AFCO supplies an extra spherical bearing and snap ring with the rear shocks.

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