Should I Weld It Myself Or Pay A Pro?

Old 12-16-2007, 01:36 AM
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inou2
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Default Should I Weld It Myself Or Pay A Pro?

I'm not new to racing, just new to welding. I building a '81 Malibu wagon for Super Pro, Super Street, and some Super Gas racing. I've always bought rollers already backhalved and caged, and I want to build a car myself this time. My question is I have done some basic welding, and have a 120v welder and 240v welder, both mig with gas setup. I feel comfortable with the cage work, and would like to do the backhalf also. It is a ladder bar kit for this vehicle. Should I go for it on the frame kit or hire this part out. The chasis guys around here want an arm and a leg, and I have neither to spare. I would appreciate your opinions big time! Thanks!
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Old 12-16-2007, 05:30 AM
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lookingaround
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since your new to welding id save up and have someone do it.
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Old 12-16-2007, 07:18 AM
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lively
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YOU CAN GET EVERYTHING CUT AND FIT THEN HAVE SOMEONE VERY GOOD WELD IT UP[PEACE OF MIND IS NICE GOING FAST]-----LIVELY
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Old 12-16-2007, 09:44 AM
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us7race
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I wouldn't be afraid of doing it yourself.
I done my rear back/half in my S10 with a 110 Welder.
It is holding up just fine. I probably added more support than needed but I'd rather go a little extra than not.
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Old 12-16-2007, 10:30 AM
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dcarr511
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Default Re: Should I Weld It Myself Or Pay A Pro?

Originally Posted by inou2
I'm not new to racing, just new to welding. I building a '81 Malibu wagon for Super Pro, Super Street, and some Super Gas racing. I've always bought rollers already backhalved and caged, and I want to build a car myself this time. My question is I have done some basic welding, and have a 120v welder and 240v welder, both mig with gas setup. I feel comfortable with the cage work, and would like to do the backhalf also. It is a ladder bar kit for this vehicle. Should I go for it on the frame kit or hire this part out. The chasis guys around here want an arm and a leg, and I have neither to spare. I would appreciate your opinions big time! Thanks!
There's a lot more to it than welding, but welding is a very important part of it. How much welding experience do you have ? Have you ever welded in a Roll Cage ?

If you can weld decently, the welding will be the easiest part of backhalfing the car. There is a lot of measuring and remeasuring. Making sure the rear clip stays square with the body, finding the driveline centerline, mocking up and measuring for the wheel tubs. Figuring out rear housing and wheel widths.

Are you planning on buying a prebent / precut kit, an assembled unit that you put in place then weld in.

Can you put everything in place and tack weld in location and have someone who knows how to weld come over and weld it up ?

Or can you practice enough to make certain 100 % that your welding wont be an issue.
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Old 12-16-2007, 10:33 AM
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inou2
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Thanks for the input! I think I'll tack it in, and just have someone from a welding shop finish the welds. Does this sound like a good compromise?
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Old 12-16-2007, 12:26 PM
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I HAVE ALL MY SERIOUS WELDING DONE BY ONE OF MY PRO FRIENDS/ I DO THE SIMPLE WELDS-----TAKE YOUR TIME /MEASURE ONCE/THEN AGAIN/THEN AGAIN --MAKE SURE EVERYTHING FITS AND WORKS TOGETHER[THAT IS WHERE TACKING IN PLACE IS NICE--THEN LET THE PRO TAKE IT FROM THERE---YOU WILL STILL ENJOY IT AND WILL BE BUILDING IT YOURSELF----GOOD LUCK---LIVELY
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Old 12-17-2007, 12:19 AM
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edvancedengines
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I am an average self-taught welder with a good Millermatic 200. I guess I look at things different. I have no problem with fabing and engineering and cutting to fit and fitting tubes both square, rectangular and round, when doing front or rear subframes or even complete frame from ground up. Have a 16 foot heavy duty chassis jig. Didn't alwys though. Never had any issues with even my ugliest welding breaking or cracking. My pretty welding is pretty but I can not always make it pretty as I am not a professional. I do get good penetration though and I prep metal by cleaning any rust paint etc away before welding.

No way shape or form will I trust myself to weld up a roll cage for me or for anyone else to ride in. I will go as far as doing the fitting and tacking but will not trust my welding on a roll cage. Usually you are almost as well off financially to just get them to bend fit and weld their cage in instead of going the kit route.

Ed
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Old 12-17-2007, 05:25 AM
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Tod74
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ask this guy. This is a repost but maybe you missed it.

http://rides.webshots.com/video/3026...01149359WVpyxw
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Old 12-17-2007, 04:46 PM
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inou2
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Thanks for the all the help on this. I've seen that video before, and it did'nt help my self confidence a bit when it comes to welding! May never leave on the button any more either! :roll:
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