this is bushsh**

Old 09-08-2007, 04:53 PM
  #1  
Timmyboy86
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Default this is bushsh**

why can't you use a damn stick welder to weld your rollcage i think thats stupid they say its not as strong i say prove it! i don't have 500+ to waste on a welder i'm only going to use once.
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Old 09-08-2007, 05:50 PM
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gdmii
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I think their reasoning is that guys don't get the slag off and wind up with a contaminated weld. I agree though. A good stick weld is just as strong as any MIG weld. Just ask the guys floating on the aircraft carriers out in the Gulf.

George
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Old 09-09-2007, 12:31 AM
  #3  
SST4530
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Yes and no. You have to be an extremely good welder with ideal conditions to acheive an arc weld any where near as good as a mig. The arc weld tends to have more porosity and be more brittle. On the other hand I've seen many do it your selfer have welds fail with a mig because of incorrect heat, wire speed settings, and poor fit causing them to bridge the gap. No offense, but In my opinion if your just a part time dobber then you should have someone weld your cage or suspension for you. :wink:
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Old 09-09-2007, 03:29 PM
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BillyShope
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Personally, I prefer an oxy-acetylene weld over stick, MIG, or TIG. I like to see that metal flow!

The author of that HP book on welding mentions a BRAZED tube frame sports racer he built. I'm certainly not promoting the filling of excessive gaps, but I don't have the patience to work with tubing until it has a fit that can be brazed.
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Old 09-10-2007, 03:56 PM
  #5  
ken0069
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As far as the welds themselves go, some are better suited to particular tasks than others. It's awfully difficult to weld 11ga pipe with an ARC welder without burning thru. Frame rails on a regular rectangular frame are only .083 wall and that's even thinner than the 11ga. MIG or TIG would be the preferred method of welding on that material also. Now around the rear end housing 4link plates or ladder bar mounts I always use an ARC welder to make sure I get good penitration there. Yup, I guess the bottom line is any weld be it TIG, MIG, Osy Fuel or Stick is only as good as the person doing it!

When I built my Studebaker it had been a few years since I had done any MIG welding to amount to anything so I got a friend who does it all the time to do the finish welding after I tacked it all together. Welding is just like a lot of other stuff, you have to do it on a regular basis to be good at it.
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Old 09-10-2007, 07:52 PM
  #6  
zipper06
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Hey, Ken

You want to sell that Stupidbaker? I luv stupidbakers, in fact i was looking for one for almost a yr. and gave up and built my Malibu. I got a nice 1941 glass willys with an Alston tube chassis certifiable to 7.50 that needs finish welding for part trade. I got a great blower motor that's just aching to sit in a Stubidbaker, like the black one that's for sale for $30,000.00 on RJ.

Zip.
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Old 09-10-2007, 09:14 PM
  #7  
ken0069
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I haven't really thought about selling it but everything has a price! If you're serious, PM me a phone number and a time to call ya.
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Old 09-12-2007, 07:14 AM
  #8  
ken0069
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Humm, I guess you weren't serious then? :shock: That's kinda what I thought. :wink:
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Old 09-12-2007, 11:24 PM
  #9  
zipper06
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Ken you have a PM,

Sorry i missed the post and the delayed action.

Zip.
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Old 09-13-2007, 11:19 PM
  #10  
SST4530
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Originally Posted by ken0069
As far as the welds themselves go, some are better suited to particular tasks than others. It's awfully difficult to weld 11ga pipe with an ARC welder without burning thru. Frame rails on a regular rectangular frame are only .083 wall and that's even thinner than the 11ga. MIG or TIG would be the preferred method of welding on that material also. Now around the rear end housing 4link plates or ladder bar mounts I always use an ARC welder to make sure I get good penitration there. Yup, I guess the bottom line is any weld be it TIG, MIG, Osy Fuel or Stick is only as good as the person doing it!

When I built my Studebaker it had been a few years since I had done any MIG welding to amount to anything so I got a friend who does it all the time to do the finish welding after I tacked it all together. Welding is just like a lot of other stuff, you have to do it on a regular basis to be good at it.
I agree, I use just about all the different processes and it depends entirely on the application, but I never arc weld on my race car. Here is really good artical from Miller I received about basic TIG operation and why it's the prefered method for welding a race car chassiss.

http://www.millerwelds.com/education...rticle109.html
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