Engine Builder ? or Not ?

Old 07-15-2013, 08:00 PM
  #11  
markdunlap
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Default Engine.

I assemble about 6-10 engines a year. Been doing it for 30 years. I love making every clearance right and logging every spec, with pics and a black book on every engine.

My biggest hang up is most of the older good machinist have hung it up.
Not enough rebuilding going on around here to keep a shop open.
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Old 07-15-2013, 08:21 PM
  #12  
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Originally Posted by wazup
Now that's a loaded ?

I build engines and there is a lot to an engine even after its been machined that has to be done.

I do a lot of work to my engine before it hits the machine shop. I don't consider a machinist that works with machines (lathe as you put it) or any other machines a engine builder, just because he or she can run a lathe don't make them an engine builder. I know I few good builders that have there machine work done at a different shop.

So like Zip what dose that make me. Bj you and so do a lot of other people anyone can put one together but staying together is another thing.

Lol corrrect on staying together...

It is a good Question isn't it.
:roll:
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Old 07-16-2013, 06:38 AM
  #13  
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I love it. I agree with Mark, the guys today just don't care.
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Old 07-16-2013, 08:01 AM
  #14  
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I do what I do best and my machinist does what he does best. he aint putting my engines together and I aint machining my parts.
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Old 07-16-2013, 09:28 AM
  #15  
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Some of it I do myself, some of it I have done. Valve work I don't have specific machinery for although we could set up and do it. Cutting the head deck surface, no problem. Decking blocks, boring, honing easy enough. Line bore or hone, don't have the tooling. Piston work, yep. Balancing I could, have access to balancer, but don't. I do all the small special machining on my parts that need to be done to make things just the way I want them.

Most of it comes down to cost verses time to set up and do it myself. Running the machine shop I'm in, having such a large family, and trying to race some makes me choose not to do it myself most of the time.

I just wish I had Zip's knowledge base to go along with my access to the machinery.

Curtis
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Old 07-16-2013, 10:04 AM
  #16  
oldandtired
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I'm with Zip and Mark.
I am an assembler and blueprint specialist. I have a small fortune in measuring and speciality tools! :shock:

I do all the porting, polishing, cc'ing, knife edging of crank, deburring the block, piston finishing, install cam bearings, and provide the bob weight of my rotating assembly.
I farm out the decking, cylinder bore/hone, the crank turn/polish and the five angle valve job.

From there, every engine gets the white glove assembly treatment including pictures and log book. Every measurement, part number and cost is recorded. I put a code on the oil pan rail so I know if I've worked on the motor before.
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Old 07-16-2013, 12:02 PM
  #17  
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Originally Posted by oldandtired
I'm with Zip and Mark.
I am an assembler and blueprint specialist. I have a small fortune in measuring and speciality tools! :shock:

I do all the porting, polishing, cc'ing, knife edging of crank, deburring the block, piston finishing, install cam bearings, and provide the bob weight of my rotating assembly.
I farm out the decking, cylinder bore/hone, the crank turn/polish and the five angle valve job.

From there, every engine gets the white glove assembly treatment including pictures and log book. Every measurement, part number and cost is recorded. I put a code on the oil pan rail so I know if I've worked on the motor before.

Builder !
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Old 07-16-2013, 02:37 PM
  #18  
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I know a couple guys that don't check ANYTHING just bolt the shit together and hope for the best. They really trust the machine shop. NOT ME. I check everything that I am capable of checking on my own. I ball mic the bearings and mic the crank to get my oil clearance. I do have a dial bore but not a real good one, so I have the machinist measure the rods and main bores to give me the number to do the math....I used to try and torque the bearings in the rods and mic the crank and zero the dial bore to the mic but didnt like scratching the bearings and don't trust my technique with dial bore too good...so I went to the ball mic way.

I once had my crank in and spun it and heard a clicking noise....took it out and found out there was a weight in the crank under a plug they welded in that was loose. I took it back and told him there was an issue with the crank. He acted annoyed and asked " what's wrong with it?" I picked it up out of the box and shook it.....he said "ok leave there will be no charge!!" lol

Trust nobody even the best machinist have a boo boo now and then.
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Old 07-16-2013, 02:58 PM
  #19  
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Tod you may remember this. Back a few years ago there was a post going around about a company out west that sold a bottom end that had a rod bolt failure. I know the company's name but really don't want to drag them back in 4 or so years later..

My point is that the two areas that are easy overlooked that cause major damage is Rod Bolt failure and broken valve springs...

I swear I saw a assembler one time put a bottom end together and either the block or something wasn't notched or something. Each rotation was metal on metal ( knicking ) ..he said " Ahhh hell it will fix itself"....and the bad thing IT DID and run like a scalded dog in a round track car..LMAO..
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Old 07-16-2013, 03:25 PM
  #20  
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BJ speaking of roundy round cars. Buddy of mine has been a mechanic all his life. He's probably 65 or 66 now. He's as much of a genius as he is a dip chit. He built his dirt track motor (ford 351) and took the car out in the yard to play. After about 20 doughnuts and a few wide open passes between the telephone polls he came back to the shop. When he got back it was making a ton of noise. As soon as he got out he said I forgot to tighten the rod bolts. lol Me and my other friend laughed so hard I almost had to sit down. They were all only hand tight and all he did was tighten them right on up. That old motor lasted him an entire season of hard racing and never had a bearing fail.
That's back when it was fun!! I miss those days a lot!!!!
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