[Gallery] Seal Beach Classic Car Show Was a Feast for the Eyes

Click Here to Begin Slideshow Signaling another return to the “normal” of pre-COVID-19 activities, the 34th annual Seal Beach Classic Car Show in Seal Beach, California took place on Saturday, April 30th as more than 500 classic cars and trucks - and their proud owners - lined the streets of this Pacific Ocean-adjacent town to celebrate all things automotive. Held on a perfect spring day, participants began arriving about 7AM, two hours before the public was intended to show up. Of course, with residents able to walk from their homes, they were soon swarming Main Street and the adjoining streets to soak up the sights, sounds and smells of this festival. With a youthful band engaged at the foot of Main at Ocean Avenue, adjacent to the Seal Beach Pier, and with the local Lions Club serving a traditional pancake breakfast - and hot dogs for lunch - the atmosphere was totally inviting. Most of the vehicles were post-WWII, but there were a few pre-war cars scattered around the three-block-plus area. Restaurants remained open and used their dining parklets to serve customers throughout the day. The show ran from 9 to 3PM under sunny skies and temps in the low ‘70s. Being less than half a mile from the Pacific helped keep everyone comfortable. For those who couldn’t walk to the venue, visitors were bussed from the Naval Weapons Station about a mile away, as parking nearby was difficult, if not impossible. With side streets and Electric Avenue festooned with cars and trucks being shown, using a double-decker bus as transport for attendees was advantageous for both those attending and those showing their precious vehicles. There were cars, trucks and toys for everyone, with an entire block of Plymouth vehicles on display on Ocean, while another Ocean block was dedicated to British Austin-Healey 3000s, an Austin 100M, bug-eye Austin Sprites, Triumph TR6s, Triumph Spitfires, MGAs and MGBs. The number of Ford Mustangs ranged from 1964s to some of the more modern varieties. There was even a Corvette on Main Street with a Volvo P1800-like body attached. Yes, it was for sale. As were many of the cars on exhibit. A rare Studebaker Rockne was on Ocean Avenue, festooned with American flags and an explanation of the vehicle dedicated to the late Notre Dame football coach Knute Rockne, who had been a spokesman for Studebaker. Unfortunately, Rockne died in a 1931 plane crash before the manufacturer got one car off the assembly line in 1932; today there are only seven 1923 Rockne Model 75s known to be registered; this one has been modified. Other unusual vehicles included a 1952 Alvis convertible, A Jeepster convertible, Seal Beach PD’s Saleen Mustang - not used in apprehension of over-the-limit drivers - on display, a Fiat Jolly, an Austin America (similar to the Mini Cooper that originally sold for about $1,000), a Morris Minor woody wagon, several Nash Metropolitans, a Ford Starliner in immaculate condition, several highly restored VW Type2 buses, a VW pickup truck, and a recreation of a Jaguar 100M, made in Coventry England and finished beautifully. There were Corvettes of every vintage from 1954 on up, with most of them from the 1970s. There were a few “rat rods” and unrestored cars to look at, and there were local vehicles owned by the original purchaser’s children or even their grandchildren. Stories abounded relating how the cars came to be owned by the original purchaser and how they remained in the family. Fascinating. Last year’s Seal Beach Classic Car Show was held in October, once pandemic rules had started to be relaxed. The city’s Chamber of Commerce was determined to return to the standard show date of the last Saturday in April. It was a roaring success. Click Here to Begin Slideshow

[Gallery] Seal Beach Classic Car Show Was a Feast for the Eyes

Click Here to Begin Slideshow



Signaling another return to the “normal” of pre-COVID-19 activities, the 34th annual Seal Beach Classic Car Show in Seal Beach, California took place on Saturday, April 30th as more than 500 classic cars and trucks - and their proud owners - lined the streets of this Pacific Ocean-adjacent town to celebrate all things automotive.

Held on a perfect spring day, participants began arriving about 7AM, two hours before the public was intended to show up. Of course, with residents able to walk from their homes, they were soon swarming Main Street and the adjoining streets to soak up the sights, sounds and smells of this festival. With a youthful band engaged at the foot of Main at Ocean Avenue, adjacent to the Seal Beach Pier, and with the local Lions Club serving a traditional pancake breakfast - and hot dogs for lunch - the atmosphere was totally inviting.

Most of the vehicles were post-WWII, but there were a few pre-war cars scattered around the three-block-plus area. Restaurants remained open and used their dining parklets to serve customers throughout the day. The show ran from 9 to 3PM under sunny skies and temps in the low ‘70s. Being less than half a mile from the Pacific helped keep everyone comfortable.

For those who couldn’t walk to the venue, visitors were bussed from the Naval Weapons Station about a mile away, as parking nearby was difficult, if not impossible. With side streets and Electric Avenue festooned with cars and trucks being shown, using a double-decker bus as transport for attendees was advantageous for both those attending and those showing their precious vehicles.

There were cars, trucks and toys for everyone, with an entire block of Plymouth vehicles on display on Ocean, while another Ocean block was dedicated to British Austin-Healey 3000s, an Austin 100M, bug-eye Austin Sprites, Triumph TR6s, Triumph Spitfires, MGAs and MGBs. The number of Ford Mustangs ranged from 1964s to some of the more modern varieties. There was even a Corvette on Main Street with a Volvo P1800-like body attached. Yes, it was for sale. As were many of the cars on exhibit.

A rare Studebaker Rockne was on Ocean Avenue, festooned with American flags and an explanation of the vehicle dedicated to the late Notre Dame football coach Knute Rockne, who had been a spokesman for Studebaker. Unfortunately, Rockne died in a 1931 plane crash before the manufacturer got one car off the assembly line in 1932; today there are only seven 1923 Rockne Model 75s known to be registered; this one has been modified.

Other unusual vehicles included a 1952 Alvis convertible, A Jeepster convertible, Seal Beach PD’s Saleen Mustang - not used in apprehension of over-the-limit drivers - on display, a Fiat Jolly, an Austin America (similar to the Mini Cooper that originally sold for about $1,000), a Morris Minor woody wagon, several Nash Metropolitans, a Ford Starliner in immaculate condition, several highly restored VW Type2 buses, a VW pickup truck, and a recreation of a Jaguar 100M, made in Coventry England and finished beautifully. There were Corvettes of every vintage from 1954 on up, with most of them from the 1970s.

There were a few “rat rods” and unrestored cars to look at, and there were local vehicles owned by the original purchaser’s children or even their grandchildren. Stories abounded relating how the cars came to be owned by the original purchaser and how they remained in the family. Fascinating.

Last year’s Seal Beach Classic Car Show was held in October, once pandemic rules had started to be relaxed. The city’s Chamber of Commerce was determined to return to the standard show date of the last Saturday in April. It was a roaring success.

Click Here to Begin Slideshow

Beautifully restored VW pickup-min

Beautifully restored VW pickup.

[Gallery] Seal Beach Classic Car Show Was a Feast for the Eyes

Corvette Volvo.

[Gallery] Seal Beach Classic Car Show Was a Feast for the Eyes

Honda N coupe and hot rod.

[Gallery] Seal Beach Classic Car Show Was a Feast for the Eyes

Kid Car

[Gallery] Seal Beach Classic Car Show Was a Feast for the Eyes

Morris Minor woody wagon.

[Gallery] Seal Beach Classic Car Show Was a Feast for the Eyes

Police department's Saleen Mustang.

[Gallery] Seal Beach Classic Car Show Was a Feast for the Eyes

Starliner

[Gallery] Seal Beach Classic Car Show Was a Feast for the Eyes

[Gallery] Seal Beach Classic Car Show Was a Feast for the Eyes

Studebaker Rockne.

[Gallery] Seal Beach Classic Car Show Was a Feast for the Eyes

The band rocked on!

[Gallery] Seal Beach Classic Car Show Was a Feast for the Eyes

VW pickup and Fiat Jolly.

[Gallery] Seal Beach Classic Car Show Was a Feast for the Eyes

1954 Corvette for sale

[Gallery] Seal Beach Classic Car Show Was a Feast for the Eyes

1952 Alvis drophead.

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About Anne Proffit 1248 Articles
Anne Proffit traces her love of racing - in particular drag racing - to her childhood days in Philadelphia, where Atco Dragway, Englishtown and Maple Grove Raceway were destinations just made for her. As a diversion, she was the first editor of IMSA’s Arrow newsletter, and now writes about and photographs sports cars, Indy cars, Formula 1, MotoGP, NASCAR, Formula Drift, Red Bull Global Rallycross - in addition to her first love of NHRA drag racing. A specialty is a particular admiration for the people that build and tune drag racing engines.

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