Everything You Need To Know About Modern Gaskets: Part 4

This is a great one-piece oil pan gasket innovation from Mahle. It consists of a rigid carrier sandwiched by a silicone rubber layer and each pan bolt hole is reinforce. Note the built-in “notches” for a stroker crank.

Everything You Need To Know About Modern Gaskets

Click Here to Begin Slideshow

When we left you in the last issue, we were deep into header gaskets, intake gaskets and valve cover gaskets from the folks at Mahle Performance. Given today’s rapid advances in technology, there were considerable improvements over what we’re used to. Mahle’s R&D program truly marched those gaskets forward.

And the same can be said for oil pan gaskets. While Mahle offers a wide range of oil pan gaskets for various engines, one of the neatest is their one piece setup. Here, the side rails and the end seals are combined in one assembly. What really makes it work is the rigid carrier that is used inside each pan rail. That carrier is sandwiched by a silicone rubber layer. Each pan bolt hole is reinforced. If you examine the accompanying photos, you’ll note the rails as well as the end seals also have multiple sealing beads. This setup, coupled with the fact the end seal and the rails are one piece pretty much prevents oil leaks. Finally, the example shown in the photos is manufactured with the side rails “notched” for rod clearance (stroker crank).

As far as other oil pan gaskets are concerned, Mahle offers them in rubberized fiber as well as a steel core laminate with a Teflon coating on one side. They come in several different thicknesses – from 0.062-inch, all the way up to 0.185-inch, dependent upon the application and the gasket type.

While we’re downstairs, let’s ponder the rear main seal for a minute. There are two different high performance materials available from Mahle – Silicone and Viton. Standard main seals were once manufactured from Nitryl rubber, but they were limited in heat resistance. That’s why most OEM’s switched to a form of polyacrylate. It offered (and still does) good heat resistance (up to 350-degrees or so) and reasonably good abrasion resistance. Silicone seals on the other hand can withstand temperatures up to 480-degrees F or so. Viton seals combine the abrasion resistance of polyacrylate with high heat resistance (up to approximately 450-degrees F or so).

With silicone seals, you have to ensure the seal is properly installed. In the case of Mahle, their silicone seals include a small plastic “shoe horn”. The idea here is to use it during the installation to prevent seal damage that can be caused by contact with a sharp end on either the cylinder block or the main cap. Mahle also recommends you initially torque the main cap bolts to 10-12 foot-pounds. Then tap the crankshaft rearward (using a soft hammer). Then tap the crank forward. At this point, you can continue to torque the fasteners to spec.

In any case, with a two piece rear main seal, it’s always a good practice to offset the parting line in relation to the cap. In addition, a small dab of silicone on the seal parting lines is a good idea in order to prevent leaks.

On the front end of the engine, Mahle high performance and race timing covers are different than traditional paper gaskets (although they still offer paper gaskets). Here, the gaskets are composite. But there’s a twist: The timing cover gasket is based upon an embossed aluminum core with a laminated fiber exterior. The embossing works just like the embossing on the MLS head and header gaskets, sealing potential leak paths. Mahle uses the very same process for their high performance water pump (to block) gaskets, mechanical fuel pump (to block) gasket, distributor gasket along with their thermostat housing gasket.

Speaking of thermostat housing gaskets: One place that’s prone to leaks on many hot rods is the thermostat housing gasket. It’s usually the result of a warped chrome housing, but there can be other factors as well. Sometimes, no amount of persuasion (or sealant) can resolve the issue. Mahle has a really cool (no pun intended) solution: It’s a composite gasket based upon a cast aluminum core with a silicone sealing surface. The gasket is 0.117-inch thick (in comparison to the previously mentioned aluminum core gasket that measures 0.034-inch thick). No additional sealer is required and obviously, the gasket is re-useable.

As you can see, Mahle offers a huge array of extremely high quality gaskets for the racing and high performance world. Many of them bring innovative sealing solutions and technology to the racing world. And while we zoomed in on the Chevy big block for this series, Mahle offers gaskets for all popular high performance applications. You can download a copy of their high performance catalog (GA-40-20) HERE.

For a closer look at the gaskets discussed in this segment, Click Here to Begin Slideshow.

Everything You Need To Know About Modern Gaskets: Part 4

This is a great one-piece oil pan gasket innovation from Mahle. It consists of a rigid carrier sandwiched by a silicone rubber layer and each pan bolt hole is reinforce. Note the built-in “notches” for a stroker crank.

Everything You Need To Know About Modern Gaskets: Part 4

There are two different high performance materials available from Mahle – Silicone and Viton. The text details the differences between them.

Everything You Need To Know About Modern Gaskets: Part 4

Included with the main seals is this little “shoehorn”. The purpose is to prevent seal damage that can be caused by contact with a sharp end on either the cylinder block or the main cap.

Everything You Need To Know About Modern Gaskets: Part 4

The Mahle high performance timing cover gasket is based upon an embossed aluminum core with a laminated fiber exterior. The embossing works just like the embossing on the MLS head and header gaskets, sealing potential leak paths.

Everything You Need To Know About Modern Gaskets: Part 4

The same process is used for the Mahle high performance water pump (to block) gaskets, mechanical fuel pump (to block) gasket, distributor gasket along with their thermostat housing gasket.

Everything You Need To Know About Modern Gaskets: Part 4

This is the composite gasket thermostat housing Mahle offers It’s based upon a cast aluminum core with a silicone sealing surface. The gasket is 0.117-inch thick. No additional sealer is required and obviously, the gasket is re-useable.

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