Holley Helps Upgrade Your Classic RestoMod’s Fuel System

Click Here to Begin Slideshow All images by Enilda Aguilar unless otherwise noted. If you’re upgrading a classic truck or muscle car to electronic fuel injection or just need to replace a rusty old original tank, Holley (as usual) has you covered. New for 2019 are 17 Sniper Stock replacement fuel tank models for all popular classic resto-mod vehicles from Jeeps, Mopar, Ford and GM cars and trucks. There’s also a line of 255 LPH drop-in OE-style EFI fuel tank modules with pump and sending unit that fit in the OEM fuel tank openings on the most popular GM and Ford muscle cars. RacingJunk takes a look at these two items and how to install them in your muscle car or truck.

Holley Helps Upgrade Your Classic RestoMod’s Fuel System

Click Here to Begin Slideshow

All images by Enilda Aguilar unless otherwise noted.

If you’re upgrading a classic truck or muscle car to electronic fuel injection or just need to replace a rusty old original tank, Holley (as usual) has you covered. New for 2019 are 17 Sniper Stock replacement fuel tank models for all popular classic resto-mod vehicles from Jeeps, Mopar, Ford and GM cars and trucks. There’s also a line of 255 LPH drop-in OE-style EFI fuel tank modules with pump and sending unit that fit in the OEM fuel tank openings on the most popular GM and Ford muscle cars. RacingJunk takes a look at these two items and how to install them in your muscle car or truck.

These Drop-In EFI Fuel Tanks Modules are Direct Replacements for OE Tank Modules

Image courtesy Holley.

Holley’s new line of EFI fuel tank modules are as easy to install on your classic Mustang or GM Muscle Car as the OEM fuel sender and filter sock. Their 255 LPH @58 PSI output means they support engines making up to 550 HP. They even connect directly to the OEM hard line, although any rubber fuel lines will need to be EFI rated.

Minor Mods

Image courtesy Holley.

Since each model is calibrated to a specific year/make/model, no wiring mods other than supplying a power lead are required in most cases. However, some minor wiring mods may be necessary if using vehicles not listed on the fitment chart. The pump is also internally-regulated so you don’t need to run a return line in fuel injection conversion applications. Even better, included with each kit is what Holley calls “Hydramat” - a combination pre-filter-surge reservoir to keep fuel at the pickup under extreme driving conditions and remove contaminants from the fuel.

Direct-Replacement Fuel Tanks Built to Meet or Exceed Factory Specifications

Image courtesy Holley.

Holley’s Sniper OE replacement fuel tanks are direct replacement fuel tanks for restoration and resto-mod projects as well as race builds. Malibu. Chevelle. Camaro. Firebird. C/K trucks. Jeep CJ. Mustang. Roadrunner. Coronet. Challenger. Charger. Tri-Five. They’re all covered with galvanized fuel tanks that will hold up to the demands of fuel injection for as long as or longer than the stock tanks they replace. These are identical to the tanks you’d be able to buy if the factory still made them.

The Tool List:

Jack and stands
Screwdrivers
Wrenches
Sockets and ratchet
Line wrenches
Plastic hammer or mallet
Flashlight/work light

Important Project Information

There can be differences in how the fuel tank is secured and what connects to it between model years and even trim packages in the same year. The Haynes or Chilton service manual for your vehicle can keep you from getting a serious headache later.

This is a project that anyone with the tools listed and the knowledge to use them safely can perform in a few hours. Note that any hose clamps and rubber fuel line used must be rated to withstand the pressures in an EFI system. Tank removal procedures can vary for trucks. For example, the Chevy C10 pickups of the early ‘80s had gas tanks with plastic covers which were secured by nuts and bolts, not straps.

I highly recommend buying the Haynes or Chilton’s shop manual for your year, make and model as these will give torque specs where necessary, as well as call out specific warnings give helpful notes for your vehicle, such as the availability and locations of sending unit access hatches that make disconnecting fuel lines and sending units much easier.

Run the Power and Ground Wires for the Pump

Image source: Holley instruction manual.

Find a good spot to mount a relay and run a minimum 12 gauge wire from it to the fuel tank area. Run a 12 gauge ground wire with it and connect this directly to the battery. My friend Kyle Voss has a great video showing how to wire a power relay. Leave connecting the relay to power for last. Connect power, ground and the switched power lead from the ignition. This switched power must be “hot” when the engine is cranking and running.

Prep to Drop the Tank

Raise and support the rear of the vehicle after blocking a front wheel. Put a piece of wood on the jack pad and raise the jack until it contacts the fuel tank. The fuel fill and overflow/vent tubes/hoses need to be removed from the tank or vehicle body as the case requires.

Methods Used to Secure Fuel Tanks in Vehicles

Fuel tanks can be secured into vehicles in one of three ways-straps, brackets and bolts, or a combination of these. Most muscle cars use straps while trucks like the Chevy C/K series and many Jeeps use nuts and bolts with brackets. Use a flashlight and be thorough when seeing what you have and make sure you have everything possible loosened or removed before moving to the next step.

Disconnect the Fuel Tank Unit

Take another look around the tank, this time looking for fuel lines/hoses and electrical connections that need to be removed before you can start to lower the tank. Slowly lower the fuel tank until you can finish removing the fuel lines and sending unit lead. Finish lowering the tank out of the vehicle.

Using the Original Tank? Remove the Old Sending Unit Assembly

If you’re only replacing the OEM fuel level sender assembly with the new Holley EFI module, remove the locking ring on top of the module by twisting/rotating it counter-clockwise. I use a plastic hammer for this (sparks, you know).

Prep the New EFI Fuel Tank Module for Installation

Image source: Holley instruction manual.

Use the supplied alignment dowel to install the supplied Hydramat to the pump and press firmly to seal the two parts. After removing the two screws holding the fuel level sender to the assembly, insert the Hydramat (long end first) and pump into the tank. Carefully insert the level float into the tank and reinstall the two screws.

Install the EFI Module

Image source: Holley instruction manual.

Slide the O-ring supplied with kit supply lines and stretch it over the and around the bulkhead plate into the corresponding groove in the tank. Set the module in place. Set the locking ring on top of the module and twist it clockwise to lock it in place (that plastic hammer again).

Reconnect the Tank to the Fuel System

Lift the tank (back) onto the jack/wood block and lift it up into the car until the fuel lines and hoses and electrical connections reach. Route the fuel pump power lead you installed earlier to the pump connector, being sure to route it away from pinch points, moving parts and the hot exhaust. Reconnect the fuel fill and overflow/vent tubes/hoses. I’d use fuel injection-rated clamps here. Reconnect the fuel line to the pump. Connect the black and white wire from the assembly to a solid ground.

Strap that Bay Boy Back In!

Finish lifting the (new?) tank into place and lift the straps into place. Tighten them enough to keep the tank from moving around without crushing it.

Finish the Install

Lift the vehicle off the stands and lower it to the ground. Connect the relay supply power lead to clean power (preferably the battery). Put some gas in the tank, then turn the ignition on and make sure the pump primes. Getting the engine to start and run may take a few tries to get fuel up to the engine.

Now it’s time to fine-tune your new fuel system. Have fun, and I’ll see you at the track!

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About Mike Aguilar 340 Articles
Mike's love of cars began in the early 1970's when his father started taking him to his Chevron service station. He's done pretty much everything in the automotive aftermarket from gas station island attendant, parts counter, mechanic, and new and used sales. Mike also has experience in the amateur ranks of many of racing's sanctioning bodies.

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