Mobility Issues Don’t Mean Fast is Off the Table

Mobility Issues Don't Mean Fast is Off the Table
Think that because you’re bound to a wheelchair you have to give up the freedom of going fast? Think again. Whether you’re a driver or a rider, you’ve got options to maintain that freedom of mobility.
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The term “mobility solutions for handicapped or disabled persons” conjures up images of big ugly vans with wheelchair lifts and buses designed to take those who are wheelchair-bound to the store and back home. This doesn’t have to be the case, however. Although it’s not regularly discussed, just because you’re in a wheelchair doesn’t mean you have to give up your love of going fast or feeling the wind in your face on a bike. There have been options for disabled persons for years. Let’s take a look at a few of them.

 

Converting Your Hot Rod for Hand Control

Mobility Issues Don't Mean Fast is Off the Table
A basic hand control set-up installed in a Jeep.
Image credit: http://www.tntportable.com/images/Controls-Jeep004.jpg

Hand controls for cars have been around since I was a kid in the ’80s. These are a system of rods and levers connected to the brake and accelerator pedals and mounted on the steering column, similar to a double shot of the old “three on the tree” manual transmission set up. They can also be mounted under the steering column.

Instead of “mashing the gas” with your right foot, you push a lever behind or under the steering wheel, and when you need to stop, you push another lever. Other mobility systems utilize a single lever and have you twisting the handle to go fast and pushing the handle to stop. Mastering the set-up takes a little practice. Some of them can also be modified to allow for manual transmissions.

Mobility Issues Don't Mean Fast is Off the Table
This setup from Pacific Mobility Solutions will “give it gas” when you twist the handle and apply the brakes when you push the handle toward the dash.
Image credit: https://www.pacificmobility.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/100_5262.jpg

Also, with the technological advancements we’ve seen since the 80s, they can be controlled electronically, making it so everyone can drive the car comfortably. Newer systems such as these get rid of the rods and levers that hamper the normal use of the pedals. Other automotive advances also allow for you to remove the driver seat and clamp your chair into the car so you don’t have to have someone to help you get in and out of the car and store your chair for you, while still keeping you as safe as possible in the car, not relying solely on the wheel block locks on most wheelchairs.

 

Getting In and Out of the Car Used to Require Huge Wheelchair Lifts

Mobility Issues Don't Mean Fast is Off the Table
The Carony is one of the products on the market that seem to be designed for the disabled hot rodder. The chair is lightweight and converts to your car seat quickly and easily.
Image credit: https://i.ytimg.com/vi/-f_DPWSjNpk/maxresdefault.jpg

Once upon a time, being able to get in and out of a vehicle when wheelchair-bound meant big and heavy wheelchair lifts. However, when you want to go fast, weight is your enemy. That’s one reason companies like Autoadapt created systems like their Carony. This is a combination of a customized wheelchair and a replacement seat mounting system. The chair itself weighs about 30 pounds, making it easy to store on your own with a couple minor modifications to your hot rod.

 

Motorcyclists Can Convert Their Bikes to Trikes

Mobility Issues Don't Mean Fast is Off the Table
A very basic trike conversion.
Image credit: https://powersportsandmore.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/1280x960BSI.jpg

I have an old friend who was a firm believer in the saying “Ride to Live; Live to Ride.” He ate, slept and breathed hopping on his bike and riding Skyline Boulevard in the South Bay Area. Then one day, he had an accident and lost the use of his legs. He thought he couldn’t ride anymore, and thus, his life was without value.

He was on the verge of doing the unthinkable when a biker buddy of mine was introduced to him. “Tiny” was also an avid biker. He had also lost the use of his legs, in the military. However, he didn’t let a little thing like being a paraplegic stop his enjoyment of the open road on a bike. Because he had no motor function below his waist, though, he knew he couldn’t ride a two wheel bike anymore.

Mobility Issues Don't Mean Fast is Off the Table
Image credit: http://thekneeslider.com/images/bosshossadvantage.jpg

One of his older (in age) friends in his bike club rode a trike because he had inner ear problems. He had converted his beloved Harley Panhead to a trike by cutting the back end off and welding a suspension and axle to the back of his bike’s frame. He used a system of cables and pulleys for the transmission and rear brakes and then practiced for hours in a local parking lot until he felt he had mastered the controls to the point he could take it out on the road.

Mobility Issues Don't Mean Fast is Off the Table
A more advanced trike conversion using the rear end of a passenger car and modification of the bike’s original seat. This one uses the back half of a Pontiac Fiero.
Image credit: http://www.weeksmotorcycle.com/images/Fierotrike.jpg

Disabled persons who still want to experience the freedom associated with going fast on a motorcycle are going to need to do some extra modifications to allow for hand control of shifting the transmission and applying the rear brakes, but there are now electronic shifting kits and kits that allow the application of both the front and rear brakes at the same time by hand.

 

Don’t Want a Trike? How About a Wheelchair Sidecar?

Let’s say you’re more of an old school biker who doesn’t like the look of a trike or can’t get on or off the bike/trike without help, which might not always be there. There are kits out there that create a wheelchair sidecar and put the bike’s control in front of you – electronic start and shifting, hand control for both front and rear wheels, etc. You just roll your bike up onto/into the sidecar, lock yourself in, and off you go. There are also ready-made wheelchair sidecars that you can buy and connect to your bike.

 

Landing Gear Wheels Aren’t Just for Airplanes Anymore

Mobility Issues Don't Mean Fast is Off the Table
Motorcycle “landing gear” wheels are basically retractable training wheels that give the rider stability and peace of mind.
Image credit: https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/4f/37/f9/4f37f981402e157cc339721f8dabcebf.jpg

Racer Steve “Wheels” Bucaro didn’t like either of the above ideas. He wanted to be able to keep racing bikes. So, when Bucaro was injured in a wreck in 1998, he added an electronic shifter and and what amounts to retractable landing gear to his Suzuki racing bike. He sometimes needs a little help getting on and off the saddle, but he can lean into corners as much as he wants without worrying about falling over. He can also ride his bikes on city streets without worrying about falling over at stop lights or stop signs.

About Mike Aguilar 200 Articles
Mike's love of cars began in the early 1970's when his father started taking him to his Chevron service station. He's done pretty much everything in the automotive aftermarket from gas station island attendant, parts counter, mechanic, and new and used sales. Mike also has experience in the amateur ranks of many of racing's sanctioning bodies.
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