1969 Camaro “Yenko” Clone

Click Here to Begin Slideshow James is a generous guy. When his wife’s uncle requested an automotive overhaul, James, a hot rodder in the fullest sense of the word, did not hesitate to agree. The uncle-in-law’s Camaro already came with a 468, courtesy of Fedderly Racing Engines, but James wrote out a lengthy upgrade list which included a freshened drivetrain, sportier suspension, a little bodywork and a new shade of paint to turn heads. It turned out that the the previous bodywork done was shabby, to say the least. James had his work cut out dealing with the shoddy, twisted fenders and siliconed-on tubs. He started his attack on the mediocre metalwork by stripping the car down to its essentials and giving it a good sandblasting, then cutting the tubs off and pulling the rockers, and then applying some of U-POL’s Copper Weld-Thru primer. He eventually tacked on a new set of fenders and went to town with the coarsest sandpaper he could find. Once the exterior had been straightened and polished, James jammed the motor in the engine bay, and then attached a set of Budnik wheels at all four corners. While it fit, getting the ancillaries to tuck in tightly was tough; James had his work cut out for him cutting, welding and banging the exhaust so that everything would fit neatly. James then pulled the aging green trim from the inside, trashed the aged gauges and replaced all the panels with refurbished pieces in black. For a little added sportiness, he fitted a set of Honda S2000 pedals in the footwell and tacked on a massive tachometer. However, the interior would have to be somewhat comfortable, and so a layer of Dynamat keeps the occupants calm and comfortable while cruising. With the front fenders hung, this was beginning to look like a bonafide muscle car. To keep the gearbox cool during stoplight-to-stoplight squirts, he installed a transmission cooler. Simple yet stylish, this little giveaway would suggest to the keener eyes out there that this Camaro was not just a looker; it packed some real menace. After a smoldered set of wires, excessive fuel pressure, a broken carburetor and a faulty distributor, James had run into all the gremlins he’d see with this race engine, which is never something easy to make work on the street - but he’d try nevertheless. With a friend on hand to triple check everything and avoid another smoky garage, James felt comfortable enough turning the motor over, and it started on one crank - an auspicious sign. Next: a long-deserved coat of paint. This time, the House of Kolor would supply the Ketchme Kopper to make this Camaro a genuine show-stopper. And with that, the bronze comet was completed. With the classic shape, the distinctive color and the clean accents, the right compromise between subtlety and presence can make time stand still whenever it strolls down the street.

1969 Camaro "Yenko" Clone

Click Here to Begin Slideshow

James is a generous guy. When his wife’s uncle requested an automotive overhaul, James, a hot rodder in the fullest sense of the word, did not hesitate to agree. The uncle-in-law’s Camaro already came with a 468, courtesy of Fedderly Racing Engines, but James wrote out a lengthy upgrade list which included a freshened drivetrain, sportier suspension, a little bodywork and a new shade of paint to turn heads.

It turned out that the the previous bodywork done was shabby, to say the least. James had his work cut out dealing with the shoddy, twisted fenders and siliconed-on tubs. He started his attack on the mediocre metalwork by stripping the car down to its essentials and giving it a good sandblasting, then cutting the tubs off and pulling the rockers, and then applying some of U-POL’s Copper Weld-Thru primer. He eventually tacked on a new set of fenders and went to town with the coarsest sandpaper he could find.

Once the exterior had been straightened and polished, James jammed the motor in the engine bay, and then attached a set of Budnik wheels at all four corners. While it fit, getting the ancillaries to tuck in tightly was tough; James had his work cut out for him cutting, welding and banging the exhaust so that everything would fit neatly.

James then pulled the aging green trim from the inside, trashed the aged gauges and replaced all the panels with refurbished pieces in black. For a little added sportiness, he fitted a set of Honda S2000 pedals in the footwell and tacked on a massive tachometer. However, the interior would have to be somewhat comfortable, and so a layer of Dynamat keeps the occupants calm and comfortable while cruising.

With the front fenders hung, this was beginning to look like a bonafide muscle car.

To keep the gearbox cool during stoplight-to-stoplight squirts, he installed a transmission cooler. Simple yet stylish, this little giveaway would suggest to the keener eyes out there that this Camaro was not just a looker; it packed some real menace.

After a smoldered set of wires, excessive fuel pressure, a broken carburetor and a faulty distributor, James had run into all the gremlins he’d see with this race engine, which is never something easy to make work on the street - but he’d try nevertheless. With a friend on hand to triple check everything and avoid another smoky garage, James felt comfortable enough turning the motor over, and it started on one crank - an auspicious sign.

Next: a long-deserved coat of paint. This time, the House of Kolor would supply the Ketchme Kopper to make this Camaro a genuine show-stopper. And with that, the bronze comet was completed. With the classic shape, the distinctive color and the clean accents, the right compromise between subtlety and presence can make time stand still whenever it strolls down the street.

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About Tommy Parry 101 Articles
Tommy Parry has been racing and writing about racing cars for the past seven years. As an automotive enthusiast from a young age, Tommy worked jobs revolving around cars throughout high school and tried his hand on the race track on his twentieth birthday. After winning his first outdoor kart race, he began working as an apprentice mechanic to amateur racers in the Bay Area to sharpen his mechanical understanding. He has worked as a trackday instructor and automotive writer since 2012 and continues to race karts, formula cars, sedans and rally cars in the San Francisco region.
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