oil brand

Old 04-08-2013, 06:23 PM
  #21  
TheYellaBrick
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BOOM ! WINNER !
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Old 05-22-2013, 06:13 PM
  #22  
hold
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theres a guy on speed tawk foruns that has been testing all the oil,,,i was shocked to c some of the top oils u guys r tawken bout here tested notgood compared to the otheres
also oreillys auto parts house bran 20,50,tested as 1 of the Best yep house bran i was shocked ...it tested much better than castrol gtx which i been payen top dollar 4....nomore i switched oreillys house bran,,he also claims zinc is absolutely not need to run a solid lifter flat tappet ,,,he explains that most of the oil is designed to Not put Additives in it,,wen u do u delute it,do not put additives in ur oil he says,,an he is not gettin paid to write his stuff,he tests oil.
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Old 05-23-2013, 09:02 AM
  #23  
DRTRCR22
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Originally Posted by hold
he also claims zinc is absolutely not need to run a solid lifter flat tappet ,,,he explains that most of the oil is designed to Not put Additives in it,,wen u do u delute it,do not put additives in ur oil he says,,an he is not gettin paid to write his stuff,he tests oil.
Absolutely wrong answer about zinc not needed...!

A thousand other highly paid expert oil scientists and race engine builders will angrily argue with that notion forever!

I also have personal experience and history with numerous flat tappet engine failures within minutes of fire-up and break-in from guys who put the wrong oil in and didn't know the difference.

HOWEVER... it does no good to put the ZDDP additives in a high detergent shelf oil, because the detergents will neutralize and filter out all the ZDDP benefits, just like it's suppose to do to protect catalytic converter street engines...! Were talking the difference between apples and oranges here...!

Sorry but I am sticking to my high level of ZDDP RACING OIL in all my race engines... ;O)
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Old 05-24-2013, 04:02 AM
  #24  
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well its not only race engines that need all the goodies added,like zinc and phosphorous.ive got a bunch of older v8 that must have it.ive told everyone i know that messes with these older cars that they have to use the tpyes of oil in them that was on the shevles when they were manufactured.ive seen with me own eyes engines screwed up because they had modern oil put in them.im using straight 50 or 60 in my older ones in the summmer and come cooler weather we use 10w 40.my 62 galaxie has the original 352 has 88,000 miles on her and ive put 20,000 on her. it sat for 20 yrs and never had any modern oil in it.to me any engine built from the 80s back gets the additives.
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Old 05-24-2013, 05:22 AM
  #25  
DRTRCR22
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absolutely correct Outlaw...
All modern day shelf oils (including the new diesel engine oils) have all the zinc and phosphorus stripped out them because they contaminate and plug up the platinum filter screens in catalytic converters (yes, even on diesel engines)..!
All modern car engines have components and designs that do not need the anti-shock and anti-wear benefits of zinc and phosphorus.

But, all flat tappet hydraulic and solid lifter engines absolutely need it...! This includes all small engines found in lawnmowers, generators, snow blowers, tillers, etc., weather water cooled or air cooled doesn't matter...

There are several companies now that make and sell "hot rod" or "classic car" oils because there is such a huge need and demand to keep these older engines protected...!

You also really need to get good Briggs & Stratton or similar oil designed for your lawnmowers and small engines... there IS a difference...

As a small engine mechanic I am seeing many, many premature wear failures in lawnmowers and small engine due to wrong oil failure.
As a race engine builder I am seeing the same as described earlier with cam and bearing failures.

I wish there were national TV ads warning people of this important information...? Jim
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Old 05-26-2013, 07:14 PM
  #26  
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So Jim my question is, when you use a zinc adative what oil do you suggest a person use. Are you talking about using a none detergent oil when using a zinc adative. The reason i'm intrested is i had my cam go flat in my Elky, it was in the engine for over 6 yrs. I changed the oil and in a couple weeks it went flat. I've now changed the cam and bought Lucas zinc adative, but i used a 10X40 oil with the supplement zinc. Did i waste the $12.00 on the zinc or should i change to a none detergent oil with another pint of zinc. I've only ran the engine about 1 hr since putting it back together and i don't want this cam to go flat like the last one.
As far as cams going flat i've got a friend who run a sprint car and he has has atleast a 1/2 doz. cams go flat (rules dicate a flat tattet cam)and as you said some on the test stand. The cam manufauturers just say o'well.

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Old 05-26-2013, 08:08 PM
  #27  
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Default cams flat

I know we have all had it happen to us or know someone, but these cams going flat is happening more often than we know.
My buddies 427 BBC had two of them go flat over a very short amount of time. I wouldn't get into the details but I have the utmost confidence in the assembly and the valve spring tension and proper setting, I was sorta leaning towards the cam material/manufact. in this case, but ???????? JMO
I like reading this kind of info, I had read other articles about additives, cam assembly lubes, etc.
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Old 05-27-2013, 04:57 AM
  #28  
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Absolutely no hard fact here, but empirical evidence would indicate that the cams aren't being made of the same materials or surface hardened as well as they used to be.

I'm saying that because for years, 99% of us ran plain old Valvoline or Pennz racing oil that had little or no additive and while we suffered lots of bearing loss, seldom did we hurt a camshaft, and when we did it was usually an errant rod or broken lifter that did the damage, not a flat lobe . .
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Old 05-27-2013, 06:12 AM
  #29  
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X2 RK !
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Old 05-27-2013, 06:47 PM
  #30  
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The automotive manufacturers, saw this comming in the mid 80's and all of them switched to hydraulic roller cams and the only changes were the oil additaves, due the federal regulation for catalic converters. Now almost all cam cores are chinese made and the lifters are probably also. I know some cam manufacturer are now offering nitrated cams, they all used to be nitrated. I haven't checked the hardness of a set of lifters, but have thought of reheat treating a set and see what material they are made from. I know i could flash crome a cam and reharded the lifters and they would live with 135lbs of spring pressure which is necessary to run a good flat tappet cam at 7,000 rpm's. But i know for a fact the spring pressure in my El Camino with trick flow heads is only 100/110 lbs. The cam should have never gone flat. If i wasn't so dam old i would get after this problem and figure it out since i have all the resourses to do the heat treating anf the nitriding. Right now all i can do is hope the new cam doesn't go flat/die before i do.

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