To heat or not . .

Old 08-03-2012, 03:38 PM
  #11  
TheRabbit
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Originally Posted by fast75vega
Originally Posted by TheRabbit
NASCAR motors run at 240*'s all the time
they also use other peoples money to build them.... we use are own..... lmao
That's exactly why I said mine wasn't going to get that high.

My engine builder is a good friend and was one of the engine builders for Joe Gibbs for a few years. He kills me when he just starts rambling on about don't worry about it. They use to run there engines at 9,000+rpm's and 240*'s and this and that all day and it didn't hurt them. I have to remind him all the time who he's talking too and how much I'll cry if mine comes apart. :cry:
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Old 08-04-2012, 09:58 AM
  #12  
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And . . The NASCAR engine builders are another of the sources of my long held beliefs . . I have a friend who is one of Childress' HP hunters. His job is to massage the head and find .25 of a HP . . I get feedback from him on this from time to time, and those guys will tell you that their Gen IV engines run on a very narrow Temp range of 235-240 and they have the technology to keep them there . . (except for hot dog wrappers)

But, (and this is why I put this up here) we're doing something entirely different, with (actually) entirely different engines and purpose . .

On the Pro Stock thing, might be a good idea. Back when we were running a super comp car, we cooled it with a "Cool Tank" we had in the trailer. It held 40 gallons of water and a small radiator. We had a 12 v pump on it and had hydraulic quick connect fittings on the block and hoses. After a pass we'd just hook the car up to the trailer and as part of the between round maint, cool it to 100 . . fast! Of course this was a FED so just circulating water through the block did the trick.

Anything below about 100 might require some expensive hardware though. This summer, at most races, we've been in 104+ temperatures, so getting coolant below ambient air temps could be tough to do . . .
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Old 08-04-2012, 10:12 AM
  #13  
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You could place a small window AC unit in front of that cool tank radiator.
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Old 08-04-2012, 03:51 PM
  #14  
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Getting off subject, but I'll add I use a 2 1/2 gallon garden sprayer with a fine mist through my radiator ( fan is a puller mounted outside) and I can bring mine down 30 to 40*'s really quick between rounds. I don't have to use it often, but it's always in the trailer when I do need it.

We have a few guys that use a pump and pump water out of a cooler through the motors. Cheap cool box, but it works. An old idea that people use to do was a hot bottom end (bottom filled solid) and cold heads.
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Old 08-04-2012, 04:53 PM
  #15  
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OH MAN,... I STILL like those hot bottom ends ! :lol:
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Old 08-06-2012, 08:32 AM
  #16  
coloradoracerguy
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I'm at about 100-110 when I start my burnout. Car is more consistent when it's there than if it's hotter. May just be my stuff, but definately happier when it's cooler.
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Old 08-07-2012, 04:25 AM
  #17  
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thats way to cool.
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Old 08-07-2012, 01:31 PM
  #18  
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But wouldn't the elevation have some effect on Marks set up & ETA too?
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Old 08-08-2012, 06:06 AM
  #19  
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that it would scooter. big time!
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Old 08-08-2012, 06:22 AM
  #20  
roadkill2
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Originally Posted by DrivingMissDD
OH MAN,... I STILL like those hot bottom ends ! :lol:
"WhatchootalkinaboutWillis?"

Heh, heh . . .

On Marks post. Altitude has some effects on hot n' cold . . We don't have a lot of air up here . . Where we race we're about 1500 feet lower than Mark but racing in 8500-9500 foot air is common in both places. We'll be up there weekend after next for the Super Chevy deal and we can count on just about two tenths off our dial at our home track, but the engine temperatures are generally the same. Of course, at those altitudes the boiling point of water is harder to achieve and it takes a little bit longer to gain temperature in an engine . . (A three minute egg is about a five minute egg at Bandimere's), but because of the thin air, it's also a little harder to cool off if you're just using air for your convection medium . . (High School Physics)

A cold intake provides for a denser mixture, which is very important when you don't have much air, and cold Fuel makes a difference (to a point) as long as it still vaporizes . .

The place where heat is needed is the cylinders and rings . . We all know cold leak down is greater than when an engine has heat in it . . and there's the rest of the engine that has to come to operating tolerances designed for running at 175-185. Valve lash will affect your cam duration and lift, and there's other little things that don't fit quite as well cold as when hot . .

Just more grist for the mill . . . .
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