welders

Old 12-14-2008, 06:44 AM
  #21  
henny
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I am not sure on the models you are speaking of, but on various welders I have used, I have found the bigger welders smoother to weld with
It may be different on the model you are talking about, but it does seem the bigger welders make a nicer job on smaller welds
Years ago I had a 225 Lincoln stick welder, then bought a large 250 amp Miller. Laugh if you like, but it welded thin materials quite well. I have a scratch start TIG for it which is nice, but not as nice as the TIG we have at work(foot pedal)
I have a 220 V MIG as well. Bigger MIG s are easier to use than it
For me bigger welders seem to be easier to work with, so I would buy as big a unit as I can afford(as $$ as I could afford)
I will be buying a foot pedal TIG in the near future
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Old 12-25-2008, 08:00 PM
  #22  
kwkracing
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oh no
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Old 12-27-2008, 12:12 PM
  #23  
gearheadwelder
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Hello guys, Here is my opinion on welders. Buy a good quality ( I use Miller and lincoln ) name brand, if you need to resell it you'll get most of your money back. Look on ebay for a tig foot pedal machine and you won't see many millers or Lincoln's.
On the 110 mig, a Miller or Lincoln will work great on thin carbon steel, a little trick for thicker wall/steel full pen welds would be to grind a bevel and leave a gap the width of your wire dia. This will help burn all the way through. A 220 mig welder should be used here , but it can be done. Body shop welding, like panels and supports can be done with 110's but most good shops have 220's . So spend the money on a good name brand, it'll save you in the long run.
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Old 12-27-2008, 12:59 PM
  #24  
kwkracing
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do not weld a cage with a 110 volt welder unless you are building it out of electrical conduit, lol.
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Old 01-22-2009, 10:14 AM
  #25  
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Well for what its worth,I am a master welder,20 yrs experence.With proper beveling and proper heat and wire settings you can wld up a cage with 110v welders.You have to pay close attention to duty cycle.Over heating welder causes loss of penetration and hurts welder.Also make sure you have a dedicated circuit with proper braker.I welded at a couple dirt tracks with there fluxcore lincoln and never had any failures.220v is the best way to go and a minimum of 180 amps.
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Old 01-23-2009, 10:25 PM
  #26  
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Well, I too agree when it comes to choice between 110 and 220 welders but it just so happends that I have a 110 clark and it works great
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Old 01-24-2009, 01:12 PM
  #27  
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I agree with rdecker - use a dedicated power supply for a 110 unit. I have a Lincoln and it does an excellent job.
Never ( and I mean never) use an extension cord if you are welding somthing that your life will depend on.
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Old 01-26-2009, 05:14 PM
  #28  
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Im rolling up my pants, lol.
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