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Thread: this is what you call a "mountain motor" Warning

  1. #1
    Senior Member RACING JUNKIE
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    this is what you call a "mountain motor" Warning

    The Worlds BiggestCombustion Engine.

    check out those bearings!! I wonder if those come in .001 under..lol

    bore and stroke = 3'2" x 8'2"


    How would you like to file fit the rings for that behemoth?
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    The worlds biggest engine is the Wartsila-Sulzer RTA96-C. It is a turbo charged two stroke diesel engine and it is the most powerful and efficient low revolution engine in the world today.

    The Wartsila-Sulser is manufactured by the Aioi Works in Japan and is part of Japans Diesel United Ltd engine manufacturers.

    Below is an 89 foot long 44 foot wide 12 cylinder engine, literally as big as a house ! What I find confusing is why they haven't actually built the ship around the engine ? How they actually get the 2000 ton engine out of the plant and moreover install an engine of this size into a ship makes the mind boggle.


    These large engines are designed to power the worlds super oil tankers and large container ships. They are built to the ship owners preferences. They usually request an engine construction of a single unit and single propeller design for ease of maintenance, and not surprisingly any later troubleshooting. A single unit and single screw design has also proved over time to have a longer life span than double or even quad screws.



    These engines are built in 6, 8, 10, 12 and 14 cylinder configurations. All the engines are straight or 'inline'. The diameter of each cylinder is 3 foot 2 inches with a stroke of 8 foot 2 inches. The 12 cylinder version weighs in at 2000 metric tons and delivers 90,000 Horse Power at 100 Revs per minute, with best fuel economy at 53,244 HP at 90 Rpm.



    When I mention economy, the 14 cylinder engine for example with a displacement of 25,480 Litres ( 1.56 million cubic inches ) burns up 1,660 gallons of crude ("bunker") oil every hour.



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    The Mathematical calculation : 1,660 gallons/per hour = 39.5 barrels of crude oil/used per hour = $2,844. These figures are worked out from the basis of crude oil @ $72 a barrel*.

    $2,844 every hour the engine runs or 27.6 Gallons which is $46.00 every minute or 76 cents a second ! That is of course if the ships buy oil at trade price...if not then these figures are the absolute minimum.

    ( * at time of publishing )



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    In the image below a worker at the plant is finalising work on the cylinder block. This image shows the piston sleeves. The worker could quite easily have a nap inside one of the bores and no one would notice !











    Below are the pistons that will soon be fitted into the engine. Unlike normal car sized pistons these 3 foot diameter pistons incorporate lots of holes and it is through these holes that oil is injected through valves to keep all the working parts at a maximum low wear tolerance. Despite the colossal amounts of power output produced by these engines, surprisingly low wear rates have actually been recorded. Cylinder liner wear for example is only about 0.03 mm down for every 1000 hours of engine use.

    It must be remembered here that these engines work at about 20 times slower than a normal 2.0 Litre car engine and this is a major contributor to the life of the engine.











    The image below depicts the 300 ton crankshaft of the 10 cylinder engine. You may notice here that there are steps on the wall of the casing to climb down into the engines sump !











    In the image below the pistons shell bearings are being fitted into the engine block. They are lowered into place by a crane and guided in by two workers and a supervisor. They keep all surfaces of the engine clean at this stage as any grit or dirt could later add wear to the engine or worse destroy it, so the workers are wearing special cloth overshoes so as not to leave any abrasions on the fine working surfaces. Also you may notice that sheeting is covering the rest of the engines crankcase bearing housing to keep the dust off. These engines cost many millions upon millions of dollars; in fact, more than the ship itself that they are installed into.











    100,000 HP was actually achieved on a test bed in the workshop with the 14 cylinder model, running the engine flat out at just under 102 RPM.

    102 Rpm may sound slow compared to a normal sized car engine that operates at about 2-4000 rpm, but when an engine is as big as this then fast engine revolutions are made obsolete by the sheer power output.

  2. #2
    Senior Member MASTER BUILDER
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    100000 HP.....wonder if i can get in between the fenders....might need a hood scoop...hehehehehehe

  3. #3
    Senior Member RACING JUNKIE
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    Quote Originally Posted by radicalz
    100000 HP.....wonder if i can get in between the fenders....might need a hood scoop...hehehehehehe

    100,000 HORSEPOWER @102 rpm!!

  4. #4
    Senior Member RACING JUNKIE jmarksdragster's Avatar
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    Where was the peak torque? Gonna have a fun time getting a converter for it.... :shock:
    Mark Whitener
    http://racingfuelsystems.myfunforum.org
    __________

    Good work isn't cheap, and cheap work can't be good.

  5. #5
    Senior Member DYNO OPERATOR
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    the human mind is awsome!
    Full Time Racing,WASTED $$ division

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  6. #6
    :shock: Any takers on torqing those head studs down........ must take 2 men and a boy to carry the bar & socket up there.

  7. #7
    Senior Member SENIOR BUILDER
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    Guess the biggest question is Powerglide or Lenco????


    Mark

  8. #8

  9. #9
    Senior Member RACING JUNKIE TheRabbit's Avatar
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    can u imagine how many of the head studs I'd mess up putting that head on!!!

    cool post. I've watched several shows on mega ships, but never seen a breakdown of the motors like this.
    And he#^ no I'm not changing the oil & filter by myself!! lol. I hope they didn't use a FRAM filter!! lol
    where is the air filter?? :?

  10. #10
    Senior Member EXPERT BUILDER
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    IVE WORKED FOR WAUKESHA ENGINE (DRESSER CORPORATION)FOR 11 YEARS NOW.CNC MACHINIST ON A WFL TURNING MACHINE(JUST PUT IN SHOP JUNE OF 08).....http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oe8q6kSbHs ....WE BOUGHT A WARTZILLA ENGINE IN LAST 2 YEARS OR SO AGO.I HOPE IT BRINGS THE COMPANY GOOD FUTURE BUSINESS...YET OUR MOTORS ARE NOT AS BIG AS THIS ONE WE DO MAKE ABOUT 30000 FT LBS OF TORQUE @ ABOUT 1200 RPMS WITH THE AT(12 cylinder)PRONOUNCED A....T.


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